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The Davis Cup

The Davis Cup

The Davis Cup was originally known as the International Lawn Tennis Challenge, but soon became known as Davis Cup after Dwight Davis’s trophy.

It started in 1900 as a competition between USA and Great Britain and has grown into the world’s largest annual team competition in sport with 135 nations competing in 2016.

Competition Expansion

In 1969, one year after the start of the Open Era, 50 nations competed in the Davis Cup for the first time. Then in 1972, the competition underwent a major change of format as the Challenge Round was abolished, resulting in the reigning champion having to play in every round.

Then in 1981, the current Davis Cup format was introduced and a 16-nation World Group was created to compete. The remaining nations were split into regional Zone Groups with promotion and relegation.

The 1980’s saw a new era of Swedish players win three titles and Germany also began an impressive six-year spell that saw it triumph on three occasions. In 1993, Davis Cup welcomed 100 nations for the first time.

Australia and the Davis Cup

Australia is one of the most successful Davis Cup nations in the events history, having won the coveted title on 28 occasions and finishing runners-up on a further 19 other attempts.

From 1905 until 1919, Australia competed as an Australasian team and during this period won six titles (1907, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1914 and 1919).

While Australia did not win another trophy for 20 years it signalled an incredible era of success. Between 1950 and 1967, captain Harry Hopman guided Australia to 15 of 18 titles, which is still the most dominant period of any country in the history of the competition.

More titles followed in the next four decades to leave Australia with one of the proudest records in the competition.

World Group

In 1981, the current Davis Cup format was introduced and a 16 nation World Group created. The remaining nations were split into regional Zone Groups with promotion and relegation.

The 1980’s saw a new era of Swedish players win three titles and also Germany began an impressive six-year spell that saw it triumph on three occasions, also the Davis Cup welcomed 100 nations for the first time.

Tennis Greats

The list of names that have competed in the Davis Cup over the years includes all the best known names the sport has ever known, with the competition providing the unique format of team tennis.

Legends such as Fred Perry, Don Budge, Roy Emerson, Rod Laver, Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg, John McEnroe, Mats Wilander, Ivan Lendl, Boris Becker, Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras all enjoyed successful Davis Cup careers.

More recently, Goran Ivanisevic, Lleyton Hewitt, Marat Safin, Roger Federer, Andy Roddick, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray have also represented their country with pride.

If you wish to know more about the Davis Cup matches and fixtures in Australia then contact Tennis World Rushcutters for all the latest information.